White Rose Medical Practice – Library

While neonatal herpes rarely, women who know they have genital herpes often worry about the possibility of transmitting the virus to their babies during childbirth. This may be a sign of a weakened immune system (the body’s natural defence against infection and illness), which may indicate you have HIV. If you are experiencing recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes you should also consider being tested for HIV. Your GP may refer you for specialist treatment if you continue to have outbreaks of genital herpes while you are having suppressive treatment. Your GP may refer you for specialist treatment if you continue to have outbreaks of genital herpes while you are having suppressive treatment. Episodes of recurrent genital herpes usually become less frequent and less severe after around two years. Episodes of recurrent genital herpes usually become less frequent and less severe after around two years.

Episodes of recurrent genital herpes usually become less frequent and less severe after around two years. How Often Do Recurrent Herpes Outbreaks Occur? Suppressive treatment will usually be stopped after 12 months. Suppressive treatment will usually be stopped after 12 months. Suppressive treatment will usually be stopped after 12 months. Suppressive treatment will usually be stopped after 12 months. Suppressive treatment will usually be stopped after 12 months.

Suppressive treatment will usually be stopped after 12 months. Your GP may refer you for specialist advice if you are concerned about transmitting the virus to your partner. In this instance, it is likely you will need to take aciclovir twice a day for six to 12 months. In this instance, it is likely you will need to take aciclovir twice a day for six to 12 months. If you have more than six recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes in a year, or if your symptoms are particularly severe and causing you distress, you may need to take aciclovir every day as part of a long-term treatment plan. If you have more than six recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes in a year, or if your symptoms are particularly severe and causing you distress, you may need to take aciclovir every day as part of a long-term treatment plan. If you have more than six recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes in a year, or if your symptoms are particularly severe and causing you distress, you may need to take aciclovir every day as part of a long-term treatment plan.

If you have more than six recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes in a year, or if your symptoms are particularly severe and causing you distress, you may need to take aciclovir every day as part of a long-term treatment plan. If you have more than six recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes in a year, or if your symptoms are particularly severe and causing you distress, you may need to take aciclovir every day as part of a long-term treatment plan. This is known as episodic treatment. This is known as episodic treatment. If you have fewer than six recurrent outbreaks of genital herpes in a year, your GP may prescribe a five-day course of aciclovir each time you experience tingling or numbness before symptoms begin. If your symptoms are more severe, you may be prescribed antiviral tablets (aciclovir), which you will need to take five times a day for five days. If your symptoms are more severe, you may be prescribed antiviral tablets (aciclovir), which you will need to take five times a day for five days.

Avoid wearing tight clothing because it may irritate the blisters and ulcers. Avoid wearing tight clothing because it may irritate the blisters and ulcers. Avoid wearing tight clothing because it may irritate the blisters and ulcers. Passing urine while sitting in a bath or while pouring water over your genitals may also help. This will make passing urine less painful. This will make passing urine less painful. Drink plenty of fluids to dilute your urine.

Apply petroleum jelly, such as Vaseline, or an anaesthetic (painkilling) cream, such as 5% lidocaine, to any blisters or ulcers to reduce the pain when you pass urine. Apply petroleum jelly, such as Vaseline, or an anaesthetic (painkilling) cream, such as 5% lidocaine, to any blisters or ulcers to reduce the pain when you pass urine. Do not apply ice directly to the skin. Apply an ice pack wrapped in a flannel, or cold, wet, tea bags on the sores to help soothe pain and speed up the healing process. This will help prevent blisters or ulcers from becoming infected and may encourage them to heal quicker. For more information, see the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicine or read our medicines information page. Other antiviral medications that may be used to treat genital herpes include famciclovir and valaciclovir.

You will need to take a course of aciclovir for at least five days, or longer if you still have new blisters and open sores forming on your genital area when your treatment begins.