Researchers: Herpes May be Killing Ocean’s Coral

(2004) Koi Herpes Virus (KHV) Disease. “We’ve identified 22 kinds of emerging disease that affect corals, but still don’t know the pathogens that cause most of them,” assistant professor Rebecca Vega-Thurber said, noting most researchers looked at bacteria, but haven’t considered viruses. It’s not clear if the virus is actually making the coral sick, but with about a third of the world’s coral being threatened with extinction, researchers say the relationship should be studied. Are these viruses making them sick? (CNN) It’s an important part of the marine ecosystem that’s disappearing from the Ocean floor, and researchers now suspect herpes may be to blame. It can be lethal, and it and other diseases are possibly a big factor in the deaths of coral reefs that humans are causing throughout the world’s oceans, new research shows. It can be lethal, and it and other diseases are possibly a big factor in the deaths of coral reefs that humans are causing throughout the world’s oceans, new research shows.

Coral reefs bleaching? Do we have to add condoms to our dive equipment? It can be lethal, and it and other diseases are possibly a big factor in the deaths of coral reefs that humans are causing throughout the world’s oceans, new research shows. It can be lethal, and it and other diseases are possibly a big factor in the deaths of coral reefs that humans are causing throughout the world’s oceans, new research shows… And I wonder who’s infecting them. One of the most serious threats today against the reef is bleaching, slow death of corals after a change in the water (usually depending on the temperature) kills symbiotic algae to leave the coral to die. It can sometimes detect inflammation of the cervix and also identify some specific bacteria and changes associated with viral infection such as the human papilloma virus (HPV) and the herpes simplex virus II (HSV II).

So is threatening to kill someone because they drew a cartoon. This hospital-strength disinfectant and deodorant acts quickly on germ-laden surfaces. One of the serious threats facing reefs today is bleaching, the slow death of corals after a change in the water (usually temperature related) kills off symbiotic algae, leaving the corals to die. What drew me to the original article when I read about herpes attacking our coral reefs is that this virus seems to be everywhere. But just how these problems translate into a death sentence for corals has been difficult to work out. Herpes has long since been dwarfed by the global AIDS pandemic, which has taken more than 20 million lives. That, researchers said, is because algae will compete for space with corals in the reef, much like a weed and eventually take over.

NEW YORK—Corals get cold sores too. Coral reefs are in danger from extinction; a study conducted in 2004 concluded that 70% of the reefs have been destroyed or are in danger. Yet calculations by Lafferty and Armand Kuris show the biomass of trematode parasites alone—flatworms such as flukes—contained within the visible creatures may exceed that of the birds in a healthy estuary. Mosquitos, on the other hand, might be entirely gone. There are a number of reasons for this decline, but new research is pointing to another possible culprit. Could finding a herpes treatment cure actually save the dying coral reefs? You’ve probably read in the past how antibiotics and steroids used for livestock contaminate the water supply and lead to abnormal development and diseases in both the fish, etc, and in humans drinking the water?

We describe the distinctive benthic-associated and water-column- associated viromes that are unique to coral reefs, which have received less attention than viruses in open-ocean systems. You see, the reef is under siege by hordes of Crown of Thorns Starfish, prickly menaces that destroy coral, which serves as the foundation for the world’s most complex underwater ecosystem. The authors, led by Jonathan Ruppert, formerly of the University of Toronto and now with York University, compared community structure between several atoll-like reefs. She said the mapping project, that also involved the Healthy Waterways organisation, provided the clearest picture so far of what was beneath the surface of the busy boating playground. The coral itself hosts a collective of organisms, referred to as the coral holobiont, that spans the three domains of life, as well as the viruses that infect them. The coral’s woes are many but, aside from the warming temperatures, predators and storms that affect all corals, the elkhorn is also plagued by a highly contagious malady called white pox disease. If the current state of the environment has taught us anything, it’s that the choices made by humans have consequences both lasting and far-reaching.

By continuing to browse this site you agree to us using cookies as described in About Cookies.