Protection of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase-transduced cells from ganciclovir-mediated cytotoxicity by bystander cells: the

Although considerable attention has been directed in the field of gene therapy toward elucidating the mechanism by which a transduced cell could kill a bystander cell, little is known about how bystander cells may affect transduced cells. Herpes simplex type virus 2 (HSV-2) is a sexually transmitted pathogen that causes genital lesions and spreads to the nervous system to establish acute and latent infections. One-week-old mice were protected against a uniformly lethal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection by IL-2 alone, but especially by the addition of human mononuclear cells (MC) plus IL-2. Description: Founded in 1904, The Journal of Infectious Diseases is the premier publication in the Western Hemisphere for original research on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases, on the microbes that cause them, and on disorders of host immune mechanisms. An earlier report showed that a disabled mutant lacking both copies of the major regulatory gene (α4) of herpes simplex virus 1 induced DNA degradation characteristic of apoptosis in infected cells, whereas the wild-type virus protected cells from apoptosis induced by thermal shock. Description: Founded in 1904, The Journal of Infectious Diseases is the premier publication in the Western Hemisphere for original research on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases, on the microbes that cause them, and on disorders of host immune mechanisms. We compared various strains of Propionibacterium with regard to protection of young adult mice against lethal infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2).


The effect of Corynebacterium parvum on the protection by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (polyI:polyC) against lethal infection with Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) was studied in mice. Vaccinia virus recombinants containing herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (VP176) or type 2 (VP221) glycoprotein D (gD) genes were studied for their protective potential in the guinea pig model of recurrent HSV type 2 disease. Overexpression of the gene encoding the 70-kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) has previously been shown to protect neuronal cells against subsequent thermal or ischemic stress. The capability of crude antigen extracts from herpes simplex virus type 1-infected human diploid cells (AM) to induce protection against intraperitoneal challenge with homotypic but heterologous virus in mice was investigated. The development of immunization strategies to protect against ocular infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) must address the issue of the effects of the strategy on the establishment of latency in the trigeminal ganglia (TG). Immunization of mice with a vaccinia recombinant (VP176) that expresses a fully glycosylated herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein D (gD) induces long-term (greater than or equal to 50 days) HSV-specific lymphoproliferation and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses, the ability to eliminate a high challenge dose of HSV-2 from the epidermis and protection from fatal disease due to HSV replication in the nervous system. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are common but there is no vaccine available.

We have been studying delayed hypersensitivity (DH) to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in order to examine the role of this response in host defense against acute and recurrent HSV infections. Mammalian cell lines have been constructed which synthesize a truncated form of the HSV 1 glycoprotein D (gD). K. Intragastric administration of live herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was assessed for the induction of humoral immune responses and for protection against ocular and cutaneous challenge with virus. Increasing attention has been focused on the use of recombinant mammalian viruses as potential vaccines. Vaccinia virus recombinants containing herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (VP176) or type 2 (VP221) glycoprotein D (gD) genes were studied for their protective potential in the guinea pig model of recurrent HSV type 2 disease. Herpes simplex type virus 2 (HSV-2) is a sexually transmitted pathogen that causes genital lesions and spreads to the nervous system to establish acute and latent infections.

The formation of immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms) obtained by mixing the glycoside Quil A with an antigen preparation derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected cell cultures using a zwitterionic detergent is described. Combined/composite vaccines should be useful in reducing the number of vaccinations and provide more flexibility in confronting biological warfare scenarios. Herpes keratitis is the most common non-traumatic cause of blindness in young adults. Virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific for 13 different genetically defined epitopes of glycoproteins gC, gB, and gD of herpes simplex virus type 1, strain KOS-321, were compared for their ability to provide passive immunity to DBA-2 mice challenged intracranially. In this paper we describe the ability of monoclonal antibodies to prevent herpetic stromal or interstitial keratitis following corneal infection in an outbred mouse model. An experimental herpes vaccine protected young women against only one of the two types of the sexually transmitted virus, dashing hopes for widespread use of the treatment, researchers reported in the latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. In two recent clinical trials, a vaccine containing herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 glycoprotein D (gD2) and a novel adjuvant AS04 comprising alum (Al) and 3-deactylated monophosphoryl lipid A (3-dMPL) afforded HSV-seronegative women significant protection against HSV-2 genital disease (vaccine efficacy, 73% in study 1 and 74% in study 2) and limited protection against infection (46% in study 1 and 39% in study 2).