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•     Halitosis (bad breath). FCGS affects about 0.7-4% of cats, and is a very painful, often debilitating, chronic condition resulting from severe inflammation of the mouth tissues. This patient should undergo immediate diagnostic testing to identify underlying or concurrent diseases and to evaluate for potential anesthetic risks before extraction, which affords the best chance for cure. Radiographic changes include no changes to evidence of bone loss, tooth resorption and tooth fracture. In general LPS does not appear to be a distinct disease entity but rather an excessive immune inflammatory response.(2) While there is no complete agreement, some authors suggest a possible genetic tendency of LPS in the pure breeds (such as the Siamese, Persian, and Himalayan), based on observation of the severity of the disease.(3) Refractory cases often require extraction of at least the caudal teeth (premolars and molars) , and possibly the entire dentition. Based on this grading scheme, 16 research publications were identified. These problems can also lead to other medical conditions in the heart, liver and kidneys, many of which can be fatal.

I faced that question a few weeks ago when a friend sent me a news release from the Winn Feline Foundation announcing the results of a grant Winn had given to the University of California at Davis to study a non-life-threatening disease my cat happens to have: chronic gingivostomatitis. Expression of IL-2, IL-10, IL-12 (p35 and p40), and IFN-γ was detected in most nondiseased biopsies, while IL-6 was detected in a minority, and IL-4 and IL-5 were both undetectable. Which part of the treatment, if any, contributed to the cure requires further investigation. An unfortunate few have a much more dramatic oral inflammatory disease. ELIGIBILITY: Cats diagnosed with gingivostomatitis that have had full-mouth dental extractions performed and have not responded to treatment for at least six months. Cats with this disorder rarely respond to medical treatment without meticulous oral hygiene, which is difficult to achieve in a cat with a painful mouth. Much misinformation is available of the management of these cases, especially where novel treatments have been tried and where case numbers have been low without controls.


They are however, very common in cats. Bob’s owner tried several treatment options with his veterinarian, including extraction of several teeth and medication to manage the inflammation and pain. A diagnosis of FCGS is usually reached when severe oral inflammation does not resolve following the diagnosis and conventional treatment of evident oral pathology which may include accumulated plaque, periodontitis, feline odontoclastic resorptive disease and other chronic inflammatory oral conditions. Oral biopsies were taken before and at 6 months after the first ASC injection. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (SNAP FeLV/FIV antigen test; IDEXX, Toronto, Ontario) was negative. Veterinarians in the Imperial Valley have been treating this disease for years. The researchers have found in previous studies that systemic administration autologous feline stem cells were shown to not only be safe, but, in most cases, substantially improved or completely resolved the stomatitis.

The cat was FeLV- and FIV-negative but was positive for feline calicivirus (FCV) via oral swab. The exact cause of FCGS is unknown. Expression of IL-2, IL-10, IL-12 (p35 and p40), and IFN-gamma was detected in most nondiseased biopsies, while IL-6 was detected in a minority, and IL-4 and IL-5 were both undetectable. (He died several months ago of causes unrelated to FCGS.) Results from the clinical trial recently appeared in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine. Before the treatments, the levels of oral inflammation were not correlated significantly with any of the serum or salivary immunoglobulin levels. Before the treatments, the levels of oral inflammation were not correlated significantly with any of the serum or salivary immunoglobulin levels. Because lymphatic pathways and lymph nodes of the head are very complicated and the closest lymph node is not necessarily the most likely to show disease, it is possible to miss disease because we do not know which is the best lymph node to evaluate.

Sedation is sometimes needed for a thorough oral examination. A trip to the vet confirmed that Smokey had feline chronic gingivostomatitis or FCGS, a painful inflammatory mouth disease. In a previous article, we discussed extractions as the gold standard treatment of feline stomatitis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of this imaging modality in veterinary patients presenting with naturally occurring neuroendocrine tumors disease processes. Diagnosis of FCGS can be made based on physical examination, but determining the full extent of the dental pathology requires probing and full-mouth dental radiographs. Cats with stomatitis may drool and express discomfort while eating. Signalment – purebred feline breeds (Abyssinian, Persian, Himalayan, Burmese, Siamese, and Somali’s) are predisposed.

Calicivirus may be linked to this syndrome. has applied for an investigational new animal drug application to use its eRapa-NP2g compound to alleviate symptoms of feline chronic gingivostomatitis.